Television Presenter

Television Presenters prepare and present news, sports or other information, conduct interviews, and introduce music, performances and special events on television.

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    Overview

    Television Presenters prepare and present news, sports or other information, conduct interviews, and introduce music, performances and special events on television.

    Day-to-day

    • researches and prepares for programmes and interviews
    • finds guests to appear on the show
    • prepares scripts
    • attends production meetings
    • hosts game shows, current affairs, sports, arts or educational programmes
    • introduces programmes, music, entertainment items, guests and celebrities
    • interviews people
    • reads news, sports or weather reports commonly using an autocue
    • provides a commentary on live sporting or other events
    • presents opinions on sports, politics, social and economic matters
    • makes community announcements
    • reads advertisements
    • presents advertisement interviews (advertorials) with advertising clients
    • meets with clients to discuss advertorials
    • attends promotional events and social functions.

    Considerations

    • Stressful

    To become a Television Presenter

    • You can work as a Television Presenter without formal qualifications, however, a course in television, film, or journalism may be useful. University and Vocational Education and Training (VET) are both common study pathways.

      Take a Certificate IV in Screen and Media

    • Interested in developing your digital skills? Try one of 2000 free online courses at SkillFinder.com.au(External website, Opens in new window)

      SkillFinder is a project funded by the Australian Government, through the Digital Skills Platform Program.