Legislator

Legislators represent the interests of people in constituencies as elected members of national, state and territory parliaments and local government authorities.

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    Overview

    Legislators represent the interests of people in constituencies as elected members of national, state and territory parliaments and local government authorities.

    Day-to-day

    • developing national, state, territory or local government policy, and formulating, amending and repealing legislation and by-laws
    • helping constituents with a range of problems particularly with regard to matters concerning government and local agencies
    • investigating matters of concern to the public and to particular persons and groups
    • introducing proposals for government action and representing public and electoral interests
    • issuing policy directions to government departments and exercising control over local government authorities
    • attending community functions and meetings of local groups to provide service to the community, gauge public opinion and provide information on government plans
    • may serve as a member on parliamentary committees and inquiries
    • may present petitions on behalf of concerned groups.

    To become a Legislator

    • You can work as a Legislator without formal qualifications, however, they may be useful. University and Vocational Education and Training (VET) are both common study pathways.

      Find a Bachelor of Political Science

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